Wildtype rotavirus and intussusception

Because of the association of the vaccine with intussusception and its withdrawal from use, earlier studies that had examined the relationship between naturally occurring rotavirus infection and intussusception have taken on special importance. In 1978, in Japan, rotavirus was detected in stools of 11 (37 ) of 30 children (6 49 months old) with intussusception a serologic response was observed in five of seven rotavirus-positive children (Konno et al, 1978). It was concluded that human...

Unresolved issues regarding rotavirus vaccine and intussusception

The CDC data regarding the clustering of cases particularly during the first week after the first dose of vaccine are significant and important, and this needs to be studied further. However, the key question that has even greater public health importance and which has not been answered satisfactorily relates to the attributable risk, if any, of RRV-TV among the one million infants who were vaccinated. How many cases of intussusception did the RRV-TV vaccine cause in excess of the background...

Rotavirus RNA replication and gene expression

Laboratory of Infectious Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 7 Center Drive, MSC 0720, Room 117, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA Abstract. Rotavirus mRNAs are capped but non-polyadenylated and serve as templates for both the synthesis of viral proteins and the segmented dsRNA genome. Viral proteins involved in RNA replication include the RNA polymerase (VP1), the core scaffold protein (VP2) and the non-structural RNA-binding proteins (NSP2 and...

Development of a reporter cell line for astrovirus detection

The CDC has identified as a priority the need for 'simple detection methods that are more sensitive and more specific than the current EIA' (Glass et al l996). Such methods would permit larger scale epidemiological studies and improve understanding of astrovirus infection and immunity. To enhance detection of astrovirus, we propose development of a reporter cell line. Such cell lines have been described for several other viruses (Rocancourt et al l990, Kimpton & Emerman l992, Stabell &...

What the future will hold

The discovery of many novel viral agents of gastroenteritis has allowed us to consider the role that each may play in endemic disease of children and in outbreaks. For children, rotavirus emerges as the most common cause of severe gastroenteritis and has become the target for prevention and control with vaccines. So far, the other common pathogens of children astroviruses, enteric adenoviruses and caliciviruses appear to cause illness that is either less common or less severe. Consequently,...

Participants

Arias Instituto de Biotecnolog a, UNAM, Apt. Postal 510-3, Col. Miraval, Cuernavaca, Morelos 62250, Mexico Ruth Bishop Department of Gastroenterology and Clinical Nutrition, Royal Children's Hospital, Flemington Road, Melbourne, Victoria 3052, Australia David Brown Enteric and Respiratory Virus Laboratory, Central Public Health Laboratory, Public Health Laboratory Service, 61 Colindale Avenue, London NW9 5DF, UK Mike Carter School of Biological Sciences, University of Surrey,...