Maternal diet

Maternal diet and composition of breast milk may play a role in the development of immune-mediated diseases. It has been shown that small amounts of cow's milk proteins may be carried over to breast milk from the maternal diet (Axelsson et al. 1984), and sensitive infants may develop cow's milk allergy on exclusive breastfeeding (Host 1994). Per capita coffee consumption correlated positively with incidence of type 1 diabetes in an international ecological comparison (Tuomilehto et al. 1990). However, maternal coffee or tea consumption during pregnancy was not related to the risk of type 1 diabetes in the offspring in two case-control series (Virtanen et al. 1994a; Soltesz et al. 1994). A positive association was seen between maternal nitrite intake and the risk of diabetes in the child independently of the child's own intake and when adjusted for several sociodemographic factors (Virtanen et al. 1994b). Paternal use of coffee or tea or intake of nitrate or nitrite at the time of conception was not related to the risk of diabetes in the offspring (Virtanen et al. 1994a,b). In a case-control study maternal supplementation of cod liver oil during pregnancy was inversely related to the risk of type 1 diabetes in the offspring, suggesting that either vitamin D, vitamin A or n-3 fatty acids, which are all abundant in cod liver oil, play a role in the development of this disease (Stene et al. 2000).

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Diabetes 2

Diabetes 2

Diabetes is a disease that affects the way your body uses food. Normally, your body converts sugars, starches and other foods into a form of sugar called glucose. Your body uses glucose for fuel. The cells receive the glucose through the bloodstream. They then use insulin a hormone made by the pancreas to absorb the glucose, convert it into energy, and either use it or store it for later use. Learn more...

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