Inhalational Anesthetics

Commonly used inhalational anesthetics include nitrous oxide, isoflurane, desflurane, halothane, and sevoflurane (Fig. 1). Each of these inhalational anesthetics has a specific minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) at which general anesthesia is considered induced (Table 2). MAC is defined as the minimum alveolar concentration of an inhaled anesthetic required to prevent movement in 50% of patients in response to a surgical incision. It is important to note that infants have a higher MAC than adults, and pregnant women and elderly patients have lower MAC requirements.

MAC is additive, that is, the 0.5 MAC of nitrous oxide and the 0.5 MAC of isoflurane result in 1 MAC total anesthesia. More specifically, the brain anesthetic partial pressure is dependent on factors such as inspired (Fl) and alveolar (FA) concentration of anesthetic gas. The brain (FB) concentration of anesthetic is dependent on FA and FI: fi ^ fa ^ fb

Table S

Cardiovascular Effects of Inhalational Anesthetics

Table S

Cardiovascular Effects of Inhalational Anesthetics

Essentials of Human Physiology

Essentials of Human Physiology

This ebook provides an introductory explanation of the workings of the human body, with an effort to draw connections between the body systems and explain their interdependencies. A framework for the book is homeostasis and how the body maintains balance within each system. This is intended as a first introduction to physiology for a college-level course.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment