Weeper capuchin

Cebus olivaceus

SUBFAMILY

Cebinae

TAXONOMY

Cebus olivaceus Schomburgk, 1848, southern base of Mt. Ro-raima, 3,050 ft (930 m), Bolivar, Venezuela. Five subspecies.

OTHER COMMON NAMES English: Wedge-capped capuchin.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

Fur is tawny brown on body, with lighter shoulders and upper arms; brownish yellow head with black wedge on cap. Head and body length is 14.7-18.1 in (37.4-46 cm). Tail length is 15.7-21.8 in (40-55.4 cm). Weight is 5.3-6.6 lb (2.4-3 kg).

DISTRIBUTION

Brazil, French Guiana, Guyana, Suriname, and Venezuela. HABITAT

Evergreen rainforest, lowland forest, cloud forest, dry forest, and submontane forest up to 6,500 ft (2,000 m).

BEHAVIOR

Diurnal and arboreal. Multimale-multifemale groups of 8-50. One male is dominant to all group members and is the breeding male. Dominant display by branch shaking, jumping up and down and bouncing. Males emigrate from natal group as young as two years of age.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

Fruits, seeds, and animal prey including snails and social insects. Feed on the ground and in the canopy.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Polygamous, but only one breeding male at any time. Females reach sexual maturity at 5-6 years. Gestation is 5-6 months. Birth season is May-August. Births are single.

CONSERZVATION STATUS

Widespread and uncommon to locally common. Main pressures on populations include habitat degradation, deforestation, hunting for food, and collection for research. Listed in Appendix 2 of CITES.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS

Hunted for meat in parts of their range. Some exported annually from Guyana for research market. ♦

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