Golgi Complex

The Golgi complex, also called the Golgi apparatus, consists of a stack of several flattened sacs (fig. 3.13). This is something like a stack of pancakes, but the Golgi sac "pancakes" are hollow, with cavities called cisternae within each sac. One side of the stack faces the endoplasmic reticulum and serves as a site of entry for vesicles from the endoplasmic reticulum that contain cellular products. These products are passed from one sac to the next, probably by means of vesicles that are budded from one sac and fuse with the next, though other mechanisms may also be involved.

The opposite side of the Golgi stack of sacs faces toward the plasma membrane. As the cellular product passes toward that side it is chemically modified, and then released within vesicles that are budded off the sac. Depending on the nature of the specific product, the vesicles that leave the Golgi complex may become lysosomes, storage granules, secretory vesicles, or additions to the plasma membrane.

Granular endoplasmic reticulum Proteins

Plasma membrane

Secretion

Granular endoplasmic reticulum Proteins

Plasma membrane

Secretion

Ribosomes Cytoplasm

Lysosome

Secretory storage vesicle

Ribosomes Cytoplasm

Lysosome

Secretory storage vesicle

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