The Respiratory System

The respiratory system is divided into a respiratory zone, which is the site of gas exchange between air and blood, and a conducting zone, which conducts the air to the respiratory zone. The exchange of gases between air and blood occurs across the walls of respiratory alveoli. These tiny air sacs,only a single cell layer thick,permit rapid rates of gas diffusion.

The term respiration includes three separate but related functions: (1) ventilation (breathing); (2) gas exchange, which occurs between the air and blood in the lungs and between the blood and other tissues of the body; and (3) oxygen utilization by the tissues in the energy-liberating reactions of cell respiration. Ventilation and the exchange of gases (oxygen and carbon dioxide) between the air and blood are collectively called external respiration. Gas exchange between the blood and other tissues and oxygen utilization by the tissues are collectively known as internal respiration.

Ventilation is the mechanical process that moves air into and out of the lungs. Since the oxygen concentration of air is higher in the lungs than in the blood, oxygen diffuses from air to blood. Carbon dioxide, conversely, moves from the blood to the air within the lungs by diffusing down its concentration gradient. As a result of this gas exchange, the inspired air contains more oxygen and less carbon dioxide than the expired air. More importantly, blood leaving the lungs (in the pulmonary veins) has a higher oxygen and a lower carbon dioxide concentration than the blood delivered to the lungs in the pulmonary arteries. This is because the lungs function to bring the blood into gaseous equilibrium with the air.

Gas exchange between the air and blood occurs entirely by diffusion through lung tissue. This diffusion occurs very rapidly because of the large surface area within the lungs and the very small diffusion distance between blood and air.

Type I alveolar cell

Fluid with surfactant

Type II alveolar cell

Type I alveolar cell

Fluid with surfactant

Type II alveolar cell

■ Figure 16.1 The relationship between lung alveoli and pulmonary capillaries. Notice that alveolar walls are quite narrow and lined with type I and type II alveolar cells. Pulmonary macrophages can phagocytose particles that enter the lungs.

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